Author Archives: trenapaulus

About trenapaulus

professor at the university of georgia, resident of knoxville and athens, founder of girls outside, explorer of the smokies

Power Friday at Purdue

On February 1 I had the pleasure of participating in Purdue University College of Education’s Power Friday at the invitation of Dr. Wayne Wright, Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Programs and Faculty Development.

It was my first time on the road in a few months to talk about digital tools, and I especially enjoyed the chance to talk about our book on analyzing online talk that is FINALLY in press.

I didn’t even mind flying right into the heart of the polar vortex – I got a chance to use my uber-warm winter coat while walking across campus and re-learning how to balance on ice and slush.

 

Come see us at AERA!

Dr. Jessica Lester of Indiana University and I will be teaching a one day professional development course at the American Educational Research Association annual meeting in April in Toronto. Details are below.

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PDC13:             Using ATLAS.ti Windows 8 Qualitative Data Analysis Software Across the Research Process
Instructors:      Jessica Nina Lester, Indiana University; Trena M. Paulus, University of Georgia – Athens

Date:                 Thursday, April 4
Time:                 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fee:                    $135

This course introduces how ATLAS.ti 8 qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) can be used to support the entire research process, including managing and collaborating on projects, conducting paperless literature reviews, collecting data through mobile apps and social media, synchronizing audio and video files with transcripts, analyzing text/Geo-docs/multimedia data, and visualizing and representing findings. Although most researchers understand the benefits of QDAS, fewer have thought about how such software can support every aspect of their work. Through a variety of instructional strategies including demonstrations and hands-on work with data, participants will learn how to integrate ATLAS.ti 8 into a research study. The target audience includes graduate students, methods course instructors, practitioners, and qualitative or mixed methods researchers. Participants should have a working knowledge of qualitative research and, ideally, a research study in the design phase. While no prior experience with ATLAS.ti 8 is required, those who have never used it will be asked to watch a short webinar to become familiar with the interface. Participants should bring a laptop computer with the software installed (trial versions will be made available prior to the course). While sample data will be provided, participants may bring the following in the context of their own studies: text, audio, and/or video data; PDFs of scholarly literature; an iPad with the free app installed; a Twitter and/or Evernote account; and an XML file from a citation management system.

 

Manuscript submitted

I’m happy to report that last week Alyssa Wise and I submitted our manuscript to Routledge. Our working title is Looking for Insight, Transformation and Learning in Online Talk. The preface is below. It should appear in 2019 – keep an eye out! A special thanks to Robyn Singleton, a doctoral student at UGA, who helped out with the chapter on quantitative methods of analysis.

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From social media and MOOCs to mobile apps and discussion forums, online talk is being harnessed by people in a variety of fields who are hoping to identify the insights, transformations and moments of learning that take place in these spaces. It is surprising, then, that until now there has been no research design text to provide a comprehensive guide to analyzing online talk for evidence of insight, transformation and learning. In this book, we offer a framework to guide the process of analyzing online talk. This framework is designed to help researchers define the precise object of research interest; identify the foundational assumptions about the object that will impact research design; draw upon previous literature and relevant theoretical frameworks to craft research questions; treat online talk as data in ethical ways; inscribe boundaries around online talk for analysis; articulate meaningful units of analysis; and select appropriate inferential (quantitative) and/or interpretive (qualitative) data collection and analysis methods.

To date little attention has been given to the ways in which statistical, computational and qualitative methods can be productively joined in the analysis of online talk, as the majority of texts have focused on one set of techniques to the exclusion of the other. Equally importantly, prior texts have devoted most of their emphasis to specific analytic techniques without dedicated attention to how to set up the larger research design in which they can be usefully employed. In this way, this book is at the cutting edge in its methodological coverage and conceptual grounding. This book is also unique in its emphasis on how differences between researcher-influenced online talk and pre-existing online talk as data have important implications for research design decisions.

Through multiple examples and practical guidance, the reader will finish the book with a better understanding of how to design conceptually congruent research studies of online talk. We  emphasize the relationship between theoretical assumptions, research design and treating online talk as data. Additionally, this text serves as a tangible resource to practitioners in a variety of fields seeking to better understand how to study, understand and productively utilize online talk. Finally, the text will stand out as a focus for current and future discussion on best practices around research design to understand what is happening in online talk.

We anticipate that this book will be helpful to researchers across the social sciences in fields such as education, psychology, communication, media studies, informatics, business, anthropology, health sciences, political science and the data sciences. This framework will assist researchers in creating conceptually congruent research designs to answer important questions around how insights, transformations, and moments of learning occur in online talk.

 

 

“Media” highlights

It’s been my pleasure over the past few weeks to be interviewed by both the Indiana University Center for Computer-Mediated Communication and ATLAS.ti as they worked on profiles of my research work for their newsletters.

This is quite serendipitous as we enter into the final month of writing our forthcoming book, Researching Insight, Transformation and Learning in Online Talk, which will be published by Routledge next year.

I’m teaching a course on the same topic (analyzing online conversations, essentially) in the spring at UGA, so it’s an exciting convergence of people paying attention to this kind of work.

Conversation analysis and online talk

My most recent paper with Jessica Lester and Amber Warren has been published, and this one was a long time in the making. For years now we’ve been concerned about the (perhaps over-) reliance on scripts and scaffolds to facilitate online conversations in educational contexts. Prescribing certain ways of talking together is not always the best solution, so in this piece we offer an alternate perspective on how to make sense of these conversations.

Using Conversation Analysis to Understand How Agreements, Personal Experiences, and Cognition Verbs Function in Online Discussions

 

Come work at UGA

The Department of Lifelong Education, Administration and Policy at the University of Georgia invites applications for a position as an Assistant Professor with expertise in Qualitative Research Methods to begin in August 2019.
The Qualitative Research program offers a PhD degree as well as an interdisciplinary certification program in qualitative research methods. Information about the department can be found at http://www.coe.uga.edu/leap.
Responsibilities:

  • Candidate is expected to contribute to the development and delivery of coursework for on-campus courses, as well as a fully online version of the exiting Graduate Certificate in Interdisciplinary Qualitative Studies.
  • Position requires teaching the equivalent of two grad-level course per semester.
  • Candidate will maintain an active research program, demonstrate effectiveness in teaching, and advising and mentor students in the Ph.D. degree in Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methodologies, as well as serve as methodologist on committees throughout the University.
  • Candidate is expected to actively seek external funding.
  • Candidate is expected to participate in faculty governance and professional service.

Required Qualifications:

  • An earned doctorate (Ph.D. or similar) at the time of employment with a specialization in Qualitative Methods or a closely related field.
  • Strong record of scholarly research in an area relevant to the Qualitative Research program.
  • Expertise and ability to teach qualitative research methods courses.
  • Ability to design and deliver online instruction.
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills.

Appointment will begin August 1, 2019.

Applicants should submit all of the following:

  • a letter of interest that addresses qualifications in the area detailed above
  • a complete resume or curriculum vitae
  • copies of published research articles
  • the names of three persons who could provide letters of reference

Transcripts and letters of reference will be required only from finalists.

All materials should be uploaded electronically to:
http://www.ugajobsearch.com/postings/31643

Questions may be addressed to the search committee chair, Dr. Kathy Roulston at roulston@uga.edu .

Applications received by October 22, 2018 are assured of full consideration.

The University of Georgia (www.uga.edu) is a land grant/sea grant institution. Its main campus is located in Athens, Georgia, 75 miles northeast of Atlanta. Athens is known for its music, art, and food as well as its accessibility to the Atlanta area (see http://www.visitathensga.com and http://www.georgia.gov).

The University of Georgia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, genetic information, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, or protected veteran status.

Persons needing accommodations or assistance with the accessibility of materials related to this search are encouraged to contact Central HR (hrweb@uga.edu). Please do not contact the department or search committee with such requests.